Dutch dairy industry rest on hopes of One Belt, One Road initiative

Global Business

Dutch dairy industry rest on hopes of One Belt, One Road initiative

At the European end of the Maritime Silk Road lies the Dutch port of Rotterdam. 

Centuries ago, it played a key role in political, economic and cultural interactions with China. 

Today, the Netherlands’ dairy producers hope the Belt and Road plan will help them share their expertise with China’s emerging dairy industry. 

CGTN’s Wang Hui reports. 

Dutch dairy industry rest on hopes of One Belt, One Road initiative

Dutch dairy industry rest on hopes of One Belt, One Road initiative

At the European end of the Maritime Silk Road lies the Dutch port of Rotterdam. Centuries ago, it played a key role in political, economic and cultural interactions with China. Today, the Netherlands’ dairy producers hope the Belt and Road plan will help them share their expertise with China’s emerging dairy industry. CGTN’s Wang Hui reports.
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The Netherlands is the world’s second largest exporter of agricultural products, accounting for more than 10 percent of the world’s dairy trade. 

Meanwhile, China is still recovering from the 2008 adulterated milk scandal. Authorities vowed the incident would be a turning point. 

They’re now looking to Dutch quality control practices. 

Lying along the ancient Maritime Silk Road, the port of Rotterdam initiated the engagement between China and the Netherlands four hundred years ago. 

Today, the Netherlands is China’s third largest trading partner in the European Union. When Chinese President Xi Jinping visited in 2014, both sides agreed to work together in agriculture, particularly in dairy. 

The Dutch have learned contented cows give better milk, and good relations between Amsterdam and Beijing may be just the formula China needs to satisfy its growing desire for milk and cheese.