Contentious relationship continues between Trump, media

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Contentious relationship continues between Trump, media President-elect Donald Trump takes questions from members of the media during a news conference, Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017, in New York. The news conference was his first as President-elect. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Last Wednesday, president-elect Donald Trump called CNN “fake news” during his first press conference in months. Despite CNN reporter Jim Acosta’s persistence, Trump refused to answer questions. 

Indeed, 2016 saw a surge in made-up stories that went viral and garnered national attention, regardless of their accuracy.

CGTN’s Roee Ruttenberg reports.

Contentious relationship continues between Trump, media

Contentious relationship continues between Trump, media

Last Wednesday, president-elect Donald Trump called CNN “fake news” during his first press conference in months. Despite CNN reporter Jim Acosta’s persistence, Trump refused to answer questions. Indeed, 2016 saw a surge in made-up stories that went viral and garnered national attention, regardless of their accuracy. CGTN’s Roee Ruttenberg reports.
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Some social media platforms have started adding a “fake news” alert to posted links, and publishing a list of suspicious outlets. CNN is not included on any such lists.

“This has been a pattern for the Trump campaign and now the Trump transition, where they don’t like the news that’s being reported and they go after the messenger and I think that’s just going to continue,” said Acosta.

However, Trump supporters argue that such statement is long overdue.

“It is refreshing and it is very good for our democracy that we have a president that is trying to get us back to a free press,” New York City Mayor and Trump campaign advisor Rudy Giuliani said during a Fox News segment.

During his campaign, Trump frequently phoned-in to Fox and other channels, getting unmatched free air time.

Nevertheless, Trump famously went head-to-head with one of Fox’s star anchors, Megyn Kelly. 

The American media is generally considered the unofficial fourth-branch of government in the U.S’ three-tiered system. Its rights are largely protected by the U.S. Constitution. Critics said Trump’s practices are just a thinly veiled effort to silence the press.

This month, Kelly announced she was leaving Fox News for NBC.

Recently, NBC has come under increasing attack by Trump and political conservatives who reject their claims of fairness and instead accuse them of a liberal bias. Trump has dubbed them “the lying press.”

Critics point out that language is the direct English translation of a Nazi-era term used to attack the media.

Trump denies such parallels, and says the attacks are justified. 


Edward Schumacher-Matos discusses Trump and media

President-elect Donald Trump has had a contentious relationship with the American media, calling CNN “fake news” during a press conference. CGTN’s Asieh Namdar spoke to Edward Schumacher-Matos, Edward R. Murrow Visiting Professor of Public Diplomacy at Tufts University to understand more about Trump and how his relationship might look during his administration.