Trump’s travel ban continues to send shock waves around the world

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President Donald Trump’s executive order to ban Muslims from several Middle Eastern countries making news on Monday as worldwide protests and lawsuits continue to mount.

CGTN’s Jessica Stone reports.

Trump's travel ban continues to send shock waves around the world

Trump's travel ban continues to send shock waves around the world

President Donald Trump's executive order to ban Muslims from several Middle Eastern countries making news on Monday as worldwide protests and lawsuits continue to mount. CGTN’s Jessica Stone reports.

The White House is on defense Monday spilled over into a flurry of lawsuits after a weekend full of protests.

U.S. president Donald Trump’s 90-day ban on visitors from seven majority Muslim countries resulted in confusion and detentions at airports around the world. The order is raising questions about its intent and its execution.

Now Iraqi lawmakers are recommending a ban on Americans traveling to their country.

Americans and Iraqis are cooperating in the fight against ISIL and in humanitarian work.

“If Mr. Trump wants to keep America safe from terrorism, then he should make our country safe, too, because terrorism came to Iraq only after the U.S. invasion,” Haider al-Mawla, Iraqi Lawmaker said

Iraqis also wonder why they are temporarily banned, while Saudi Arabians are not.

Most of the terrorists who committed the September 11 attacks were from Saudi Arabia.

None of the so-called “countries of concern” have known links to those events, but all were put on a list under President Barack Obama for additional border vetting.

In a five-page memo, U.S. State department officials voiced concerns about the order, saying it would be counterproductive and that sour relations with the Muslim world harms ongoing humanitarian work and restrict the U.S. economy.

“You talk about in a 24-hour period 325,000 people from other countries flew in through our airports and we’re talking about 109 people from seven countries that the Obama administration identified and these career bureaucrats have a problem with it I think that they should either get with the program or they can go,” Spicer said.

Former President Barack Obama is weighing in, saying he supports the protests and that he fundamentally disagrees with any discrimination based on religion.

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres has also weighed in on the importance of the American tradition of protecting refugees, calling it “essential.” While the ban is temporary, there’s no timetable for letting refugees from Syria back into the U.S.