Central American migrants rush toward US as wall plans continue

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Central American migrants rush toward US as wall plans continue

Fearing U.S. President Donald Trump’s plans to build a wall, illegal immigration from Central America surged ahead of the U.S. election.

CGTV’s Martin Markovits reports from Mexico City.

Follow Martin Markovits on Twitter @MartinMarkovits

Central American migrants rush toward US as wall plans continue

Central American migrants rush toward US as wall plans continue

Fearing U.S. President Donald Trump’s plans to build a wall, illegal immigration from Central America surged ahead of the U.S. election. CGTV’s Martin Markovits reports from Mexico City.

Ever since he was child, Melvin Hernandez always wanted to leave his native Honduras and go to the United States.

“We are poor and we are looking for the American dream. We want to help our family get out of the poverty and escape the violence down there,” Hernandez said.

But after Donald Trump won the U.S. presidential election, Hernandez packed his bags and decided to leave.

“When they build that wall, we won’t be able to cross anymore. Everything is going to be much more complicated. That is why I am going now,” Hernandez said.

According to the U.S. Customs and Border protection, the number of migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexican border surged during the lead-up to the election and days afterward.

Last month, Mexican authorities said that they arrested tens of thousands of undocumented migrants and several northern state governors called for additional resources to deal with the surge at the border.

Migrant shelters in the Mexican border city of Nuevo Laredo have also seen the number of people seeking refugee increase dramatically in past several months.

Nuevo Laredo is one area on the border that does not have a fence. Here illegal immigrants get to the U.S. by swimming across the Rio Grande. But if U.S. President Trump builds a wall, that won’t be an option anymore.

Enoc Rivera is staying in a shelter ran by the Catholic Church in Nuevo Laredo. He is hoping to cross the border very soon, but he is growing restless waiting for his family to send him the $5000 needed to pay the Coyotes to provide him safe passage after he swims across the Rio Grande.

“My family has to get the money in order for us to go. So it’s very difficult. I hope my sister gets it soon because If they build wall I won’t be able to go,” Rivera said.