Space Tech Expo Discusses Satellite Detection Capabilities

Global Business

The business of space is making headlines. Last week, Europe launched the first satellite of its Copernicus Earth observation project. The eleven-point-five-billion-dollar satellite will supply valuable images in the event of natural disasters or, perhaps – even a plane crash.

This comes after a San Francisco-based startup, Planet Labs, announced plans to deploy the world’s largest fleet of imaging satellites to continuously monitor Earth. Considering the month-long search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight M-H-370 satellite detection capabilities are a topic of intense debate lately. As CCTV’s Yakenda McGahee reports, these were just a few of the events discussed during the second annual Space Tech Expo in California.

At this meeting of engineering minds, we asked questions that many have wondered since the disappearance of Flight MH 370.

For instance, how is it that Google Earth can take detailed photos of my home down to the rooftop but satellite images can’t distinguish ocean trash from plane debris nor locate wreckage of a jet that allegedly crashed there?

Space Tech Expo Discusses Satellite Detection Capabilities

Space Tech Expo Discusses Satellite Detection Capabilities

Considering the month-long search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight M-H-370 satellite detection capabilities are a topic of intense debate lately. As CCTV's Yakenda McGahee reports, these were just a few of the events discussed during the second annual Space Tech Expo in California

These experts says it’s a combination of satellite resolution, often restricted by governments, and satellite positioning – capturing some images requires pre-programming a satellite a day in advance.

But, industry leaders here say the question people really should be asking is: why aren’t airlines uploading real-time flight data to cloud-based storage services

Industry insiders say economics are a huge hurdle; imagine the cost of streaming wireless data from every single flight, every single day. But some believe the day will soon come when sub-compact satellites – orbiting 35-thousand kilometers above the earth, will be able to shed light on disasters like the disappearance of Flight MH 370.