Boston Marathon Bombing Anniversary

World Today

It was the largest mass casualty attack in the United States since 9/11. And it’s been one year since two bombs went off near the finish line of the annual Boston Marathon, killing 3 people and wounding more than 260. On the anniversary, the city of Boston came together with survivors and families of victims to remember those lost. CCTV’s Liling Tan reports from Boston.

Boston Marathon Boming Anniversary

Boston Marathon Boming Anniversary

It was the largest mass casualty attack in the United States since 9/11. And it's been one year since two bombs went off near the finish line of the annual Boston Marathon, killing 3 people and wounding more than 260. On the anniversary, the city of Boston came together with survivors and families of victims to remember those lost. CCTV's Liling Tan reports from Boston.

Deval Patrick, Governor of Massachusetts, said, “I’m glad to have this tragedy behind us and the next marathon ahead of us and I’m glad especially to share in the timeless triumph of our community’s response to this crisis.”

Joe Biden, U.S. Vice President said, “No memorial, no words, no acts can fully provide the solace that your hearts and soul still yearn to acquire. But I hope it eases your grief a little bit.” “Next Monday, on Patriot’s Day, when 36,000 people line up to start the marathon, you will send a resounding message around the worldthat we will never yield, we will never cower, American will never stand down. We are Boston, we are America. We respond, we endure, we overcome, and we own the finish line.”

The U.S. Vice President and the governor of Massachusetts– among politicians spoke to families of victims and survivors in Boston this afternoon.

The day of tribute also included an early morning wreath laying ceremony on Boylston Street– at the sites of the two bombings.

Among those attending, families of the three killed, 8 year old Martin Richard, Boston University student and Chinese National Lu Lingzi and restaurant manager Krystle Campbell.

John Odom is a survivor. He was watching for his daughter to finish the race when the bomb went off, propelling shrapnel through both his legs. He was hospitalized longer than any other survivor. His care included 11 surgeries at the Boston Medical Center, and weeks with a physical therapist at the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital.

Slowly but surely, John did learn to walk and is now back in Boston for the marathon and to say thank you to the doctors and nurses at this Boston Medical Center tribute hospital staff who fought hard to save so many lives a year ago.