For One Day Only, Google Glass on Sale

Global Business

Google Glass

For the first-time ever Google made Google Glass available to the public for a one-day-sale in the United States. Despite the hefty $1500 price, Google said that the gadgets were snapped up fast. But, Analysts say the public perception of this technology is far from clear. CCTV’s Mark Niu reports.

George Cohn uses his Google Glass for getting directions, shooting video and “tapping” photos. But what Cohn enjoys most is striking up conversations with curious onlookers about Google’s groundbreaking technology.

“There’s a certain look people get on their face when they try it for the first time. Let’s say I try ‘Glass’ for the first time and I take your picture. As I smile like that, you’ll smile like the same way, so the picture I take of you will be a good one since it has that same sense of wonderment.”

But not everyone is enjoying the view that Google Glass brings to the world. It’s even prompted Google to put out a list of Do’s and Don’ts to avoid being creepy or rude and of course, being labeled what’s now called a ‘Glasshole.'”

For One Day Only, Google Glass on Sale

For One Day Only, Google Glass on Sale

For the first-time ever Google made Google Glass available to the public for a one-day-sale in the United States. Despite the hefty $1500 price, Google said that the gadgets were snapped up fast. But, Analysts say the public perception of this technology is far from clear. CCTV's Mark Niu reports.

The number of establishments banning ‘Google Glass’ continues to grow.

“Having a limited version of the Internet sitting on your face, it’s really something that’s only been in the books up until now. I think this is something Google ought to have thought a little more thoroughly through, “says Seth Rosenblatt, Senior Writer at CNET.

Despite the privacy concerns, Rosenblatt says Google Glass has many interesting uses. For first responders and doctors, for example; and especially for travel. Glass can translate signs and tell tourists the history of everything around them.

“Whether it comes from Google or a competitor , somebody is going to come out with something that will bring wearable headsets to market.”

Google Glass is being warmly embraced at some places, like Stanford Court Hotel, which prides itself on having the latest in tech amenities. It gives free drinks to wearers, and soon, pairs of Google Glass on loan when booking a room.

“We’re trying to embrace the technology innovation that is in San Francisco and the Bay Area. And we figured what better way to bring Google, the local company into the hotel and make the lounge and hotel friendly for local people using the device, “says Austin Phillips, Director of Sales at Stanford Court.

A study released in April from market research group Toluna found that 72% of Americans refuse to wear Google Glass due to privacy and safety concerns.

But that also leaves nearly 30% who don’t object-making it a matter of perspective on whether “the Glass” is half-empty or half-full.