On Going Violence in South Sudan and Nigeria

The Heat

Both are oil rich countries. One is the world’s youngest, and the other, one of Africa’s oldest. Both are reeling from sectarian strife and religious violence. How can South Sudan and Nigeria deal with the bloodshed? And what can they learn from Rwanda, a country that was mired in genocide twenty years ago?

The world’s youngest country has already sunk into civil war. Hundreds were killed in Bentiu, the capital of South Sudan’s oil producing Unity State last week. The United Nations accused the rebels of massacring hundreds of civilians who sought refuge in a church, mosque and hospital, after capturing Bentiu. The rebels, however, blame the retreating government forces for the killings. CCTV’s Nick Harper has the story.

Violence in South Sudan

Violence in South Sudan

The world’s youngest country has already sunk into civil war. Hundreds were killed in Bentiu, the capital of South Sudan’s oil producing Unity State last week. The United Nations accused the rebels of massacring hundreds of civilians who sought refuge in a church, mosque and hospital, after capturing Bentiu. The rebels, however, blame the retreating government forces for the killings. CCTV's Nick Harper has the story.
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To discuss the violence in South Sudan, CCTV’s Anand Naidoo is joined by John Dau. He is one of the Lost Boys of Sudan, who was forced to flee Sudan in 1983 during a previous civil war. He founded the John Dau Foundation, which aims to improve healthcare in South Sudan; And Dr. John Chuol Kuek, a psychologist and South Sudanese Community Leader.

Interview with John Dau and John Chuol Kuek on South Sudan Violence

Interview with John Dau and John Chuol Kuek on South Sudan Violence

To discuss the violence in South Sudan, CCTV’s Anand Naidoo is joined by John Dau. He is one of the Lost Boys of Sudan, who was forced to flee Sudan in 1983 during a previous civil war. He founded the John Dau Foundation, which aims to improve healthcare in South Sudan; Dr. John Chuol Kuek, a psychologist and South Sudanese Community Leader.
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Also in Africa, Nigeria is in the shadow of terrorism. An explosion at a bus station in Ajuba this month killed 71 people, the deadliest ever attack on the capital.  Then, the brazen abduction of more than two hundred thirty teenage girls from their school in northeastern Borno State–190 remain missing.  About forty girls escaped by jumping from the back of trucks or sneaking out of the kidnappers’ camp deep inside the Sambisa forest. Boko Haram, an Islamic extremist group, whose name means “Western education is evil”, is the chief suspect for the mass abductions.  The group also claimed responsibility for the Ajuba explosion.

Why has Boko Haram been so active in the past three months? John Campbell, former U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria and author of the book Nigeria Dancing on the Brink; Franklin Ekechukwu, Director of Nigerians In Diaspora Organization America, and Jennifer Cooke, Director of the Africa Program for the Center for Strategic & International Studies join a conversation with CCTV’s Anand Naidoo to explore more on this issue.

Campbell, Ekechukwu,and Cooke on Terrorism in Nigeria

Campbell, Ekechukwu,and Cooke on Terrorism in Nigeria

Nigeria is in the shadow of terrorism. Why has Boko Haram been so active in the past three months? John Campbell, former U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria and author of the book NIGERIA DANCING ON THE BRINK; Franklin Ekechukwu, Director of Nigerians In Diaspora Organization America, and Jennifer Cooke, Director of the Africa Program for the Center for Strategic & International Studies join a conversation with CCTV's Anand Naidoo to explore more on this issue.
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This year marks the 20th anniversary of the genocide in Rwanda. The ethnic conflict between the Hutus and Tutsis claimed the lives of more than eight hundred thousand Rwandans, mostly Tutsis. That’s almost three quarters of the Tutsi population. But, 20 years later, Rwanda has become an economic model for East Africa, growing at an averagerate of 8% for the past four years. However, Paul Kagame, the president of Rwanda has been criticized for killing thousands of Hutus in revenge since he rose to power in 2000. He also received criticism after hinting he could extend his rule beyond 2017, which would require changing the constitution.

CCTV’s Anand Naidoo is joined by Paul Rusesabagina, founder of the Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation, who saved more than 1,200 Rwandan citizens during the country’s genocide, to talk about Rwanda. Paul Rusesabagina’s inspiring story became the basis of the Oscar-nominated film Hotel Rwanda.

Paul Rusesabagina: A Lesson from Hotel Rwanda

Paul Rusesabagina: A Lesson from Hotel Rwanda

CCTV's Anand Naidoo is joined by Paul Rusesabagina, founder of the Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation, who saved more than 1,200 Rwandan citizens during the country's genocide, to talk about Rwanda. Paul Rusesabagina's inspiring story became the basis of the Oscar-nominated film Hotel Rwanda.
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