Doctors Regrow Lost Muscle in Injured Soldiers

Insight

For the first time ever, scientists have been able to successfully regenerate damaged leg muscles through a new stem cell technique that uses material from pig bladder tissue.

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Health tested out the procedure on five men. Three of the five patients had at least a 25 percent improvement in function following the treatment, and all five reported improved quality of life, the researchers noted. Results from the small, preliminary trial — and prior animal studies — were published today in Science Translational Medicine. The research was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense. CCTV’s Mike Walter reports.

Doctors Regrow Large Areas of Muscle Lost in Injured Soldiers

Doctors Regrow Large Areas of Muscle Lost in Injured Soldiers

For the first time ever, scientists have been able to successfully regenerate damaged leg muscles through a new stem cell technique that uses material from pig bladder tissue. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Health tested out the procedure on five men.

Doctor Stephen Badylak, Professor at the University of Pittsburgh Department of Surgery, led this groundbreaking study. For an in-depth discussion on the topic, CCTV’s Mike Walter interviews Dr. Badylak.

Interview with Stephen Badylak on muscle regrow

Interview with Stephen Badylak on muscle regrow

For the first time ever, scientists have been able to successfully regenerate damaged leg muscles through a new stem cell technique that uses material from pig bladder tissue. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Health tested out the procedure on five men.