Code War: The dangerous art of spying

World Today

Espionage dates back to the very beginning of nation-states. And it’s being revolutionized at an unprecedented pace, thanks to the digital revolution. After spending a day talking spycraft with a career FBI agent who has seen these changes up close, CCTV’s Jessica Stone realized that the art of spying may never be as romantic and as dangerous as it has in the past. That’s the focus of today’s edition of “Code War.”

Code War: The dangerous art of spying

Code War: The dangerous art of spying

Espionage dates back to the very beginning of nation-states. And it's being revolutionized at an unprecedented pace, thanks to the digital revolution. After spending a day talking spycraft with a career FBI agent who has seen these changes up close, CCTV's Jessica Stone realized that the art of spying may never be as romantic and as dangerous as it has in the past. That's the focus of today's edition of "Code War."

Despite all the technology used by the U.S. government, when Edward Snowden viewed and downloaded nearly two million documents, there was no software in place to log what he was doing. We talked about that and other cyber spying issues with Marcus Ranum, the Chief Security Officer for Tenable Network Security.

Marcus Ranum on cyber spying issues

Marcus Ranum on cyber spying issues

Despite all the technology used by the U.S. government, when Edward Snowden viewed and downloaded nearly two million documents, there was no software in place to log what he was doing. We talked about that and other cyber spying issues with Marcus Ranum. He's the Chief Security Officer for Tenable Network Security.