Canadian town ravaged by oil train fire still in turmoil

Global Business

This weekend marks the one year anniversary one of the worst railway disasters in North American history.
On July 6 2013, an oil train came crashing into the small Canadian town of Lac-Megantic.
The fiery collision killed 47 people and wiped out homes, the downtown library and dozens of businesses.
Here’s a look at where things stand now:

  • An extensive cleanup process is underway. It is expected to cost at least $200 million.
  • The railroad company responsible for the accident has been sold.
  • And some of the destroyed businesses, including a popular cafe, are looking to re-open their doors within the next few months.

Meanwhile, talk of putting oil trains back on tracks is stirring up feelings of anger and disappointment.
There is also an ongoing fight between the train companies and the government for control of Canada’s railways.

Canadian town ravaged by oil train fire still in turmoil

Canadian town ravaged by oil train fire still in turmoil

This weekend marks the one year anniversary one of the worst railway disasters in North American history. Talk of putting oil trains back on tracks is stirring up feelings of anger and disappointment. There is also an ongoing fight between the train companies and the government for control of Canada's railways.

The U.S. government says the Lac-Megantic crash is one of ten significant train derailments involving crude oil since 2006 in North America. 
In response, rail companies have created new training, for emergency responders to fight these fires. 
CCTV’s Jessica Stone reports from Kearney, New Jersey.

New training for responders to fight oil-train fires

New training for responders to fight oil-train fires

The U.S. government says the Lac-Megantic crash is one of ten significant train derailments involving crude oil since 2006 in North America. In response, rail companies have created new training, for emergency responders to fight these fires. CCTV's Jessica Stone reports from Kearney, New Jersey.

Brigham McCown, a safety expert who used to run the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, shares his insight on whether after the Quebec disaster, moving oil by train is a safe option.

Brigham McCown on oil train safety

Brigham McCown on oil train safety

Brigham McCown, a safety expert who used to run the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, shares his insight on whether after the Quebec disaster, moving oil by train is a safe option.