America’s immigration crisis: Should they stay or should they go?

The Heat

More than 50,000 unaccompanied minors from Central America have illegally crossed the U.S.-Mexico border over the past nine months. Those children are now caught in the midst of a heated political battle over immigration reform.

Most of those children have fled lives of poverty and violence only to be held in temporary detention centers near the border. The U.S. government recognizes this as a growing humanitarian crisis.

Last week, U.S. President Barack Obama and leaders of three Central American countries discussed how to resolve this crisis. This happens as the debate between Republicans and Democrats over immigration continues to intensify. A decision from the U.S. government to determine the future of these children is not expected to come at any time soon.

CCTV America’s John Holman traveled to the impoverished Central American country, as well as the murder capital of the world, Honduras. He brings the latest insight on what those children risked so much to leave behind.

Follow John Holman on Twitter @mexicorrespond

Honduras: what the migrant children leave behind

CCTV America's John Holman traveled to the impoverished Central American country, as well as the murder capital of the world, Honduras. He brings the latest insight on what those children risked so much to leave behind on this edition of The Heat.

Jose Luis Zelaya, who fled Honduras at age 14 and is now a student at Texas A&M University, joined The Heat to share his story as a migrant child. John Baker, a visiting law professor at Georgetown University, and editor of Honduras Weekly Marco Cáceres, also joined for a panel discussion on the legal issues regarding immigration reform.

Follow Jose Luis Zelaya on Twitter @JoseLuisInspire
Follow Marco Cáceres on Twitter @projecthonduras

What lies ahead for the undocumented migrants? Pt. 1

Jose Luis Zelaya, who fled Honduras at age 14 and is now a student at Texas A&M University, joined The Heat to share his story as a migrant child. John Baker, a visiting law professor at Georgetown University, and editor of Honduras Weekly Marco Cáceres, also joined for a panel discussion on the legal issues regarding immigration reform.

What lies ahead for the undocumented migrants? Pt. 2

Jose Luis Zelaya, who fled Honduras at age 14 and is now a student at Texas A&M University, joined The Heat to share his story as a migrant child. John Baker, a visiting law professor at Georgetown University, and editor of Honduras Weekly Marco Cáceres, also joined for a panel discussion on the legal issues regarding immigration reform.