Thailand’s new government raises democracy concerns

World Today

As Thailand’s new prime minister, General Prayuth Chan-ocha, waits for royal endorsement before stepping into his new role, speculation is building about the government he will build around him. CCTV America’s Tony Cheng reports.

The practical business of government is slowly restarting after the coup with the passing of a budget and the formation of a legislative assembly last week. Despite assurances that democracy will be restored in Thailand, many fear that the military will be reluctant to relinquish control.

With the appointment of the coup leader as prime minister after nine months of tumultuous political unrest, at least the appearance of civilian government has returned in Thailand. Now General Prayuth can appoint a cabinet. But what sort of government will he form?

The National Legislative Council might give some indication: it’s stacked with military men and those who are loyal to the coup leaders.

However, key constituencies are unrepresented, such as women, who were outnumbered by a ratio of 20 to one.

So far, there has been no indication that the new government will reach out to the red shirts, or representatives of Thaksin Shinawatra.

Greater concern to neutral observers are the changes being made to Thailand’s constitution that could affect the path of democratic growth for generations to come.

Concerns raised for Thailand\'s new government

As Thailand’s new prime minister, general Prayuth Chan-ocha, waits for royal endorsement before stepping into his new role, speculation is building about the government he will build around him. CCTV America’s Tony Cheng reports.