Proposed laws to regulate Thailand’s ‘babies-for-cash’ industry

Insight

Proposals to regulate 'babies-for-cash' industry in Thailand

Outrage over claims that a “babies-for-cash” industry is flourishing in Thailand has led to proposals for a law banning commercial surrogacy.

A lack of formal legislation has led to the country becoming a top destination for infertile couples wanting a child.

Police and health officials in Bangkok have raided IVF and reproductive clinics in a crackdown on what has been Thailand’s lucrative but largely unregulated surrogacy industry.

The country’s ruling military council has drawn up a draft law, which would ban surrogacy in exchange for cash.

It follows the case of baby Gammy, a surrogate twin born with Down’s Syndrome. His Thai mother claimed he was abandoned by his Australian biological parents, who only wanted his healthy sister. The parents denied the allegation, but a public outcry ensued.

It has been reported that couples pay more than $40,000 to surrogacy agencies, with the surrogate mother receiving around $10,000.

CCTV America’s Martin Lowe reports.

Proposals to regulate 'babies-for-cash' industry in Thailand

Outrage over claims that a "babies-for-cash" industry is flourishing in Thailand has led to proposals for a law banning commercial surrogacy. CCTV America's Martin Lowe reports.

Sam Everingham, founder of the group Families Through Surrogacy, joined CCTV America for more on international surrogacy and how it should be regulated.

How should international surrogacy be regulated?

Sam Everingham, founder of the group Families Through Surrogacy, joined CCTV America for more on international surrogacy and how it should be regulated.