Brazilian voters deeply split along class lines poll finds

Global Business

Brazilian taking picture of Magazine coverA man takes a picture of the frontpage of Brazilian magazine Veja, in Rio de Janeiro on October 24, 2014. Veja reports about new revelations on Petrobras corruption affair, which could damage President Dilma Rousseff as she seeks re-election on next Sunday, 26th. AFP PHOTO / VANDERLEI ALMEIDA

The outcome of the Brazilian presidential election on Sunday may be too close to call, but it is clear the face-off between candidates Aecio Neves and President Dilma Rousseff has split the country along both wealth and class lines. CCTV America’s Paulo Cabral reports.

Brazilian voters deeply split along class lines poll finds

The outcome of the Brazilian presidential election on Sunday may be too close to call, but it is clear the face-off between candidates Aecio Neves and President Dilma Rousseff has split the country along both wealth and class lines. CCTV America's Paulo Cabral reports.

According to the Datafolha polling group, 54 percent of voters with only a basic education prefer Rousseff while only 34 percent prefer Neves. The numbers nearly flip when looking at the most highly-educated voters. The poll found that among the highly-educated, 54 percent prefer Neves, while only 36 percent prefer Rousseff.

The leftist president also leads among lower income voters, those who earn up to twice the country’s minimum wage. Among those voters, 53 percent prefer Rouseff, while 34 percent prefer Neves.

GFX1

In contrast, among high-income voters, or those who make ten times the minimum wage, 59 percent prefer pro-business Neves, while 35 percent prefer Rousseff.

GFX2

“Why the nation is split? Because all the social policies that PT [The Workers’ Party] has had for the past 12 years of course,” said Jos Roberto de Toledo, a public opinion analyst. “They have a much greater impact to the poor, so they are in a better situation and they are afraid to lose it. But for the other part of the country who has been suffering with the economic stagnation for two, three years, those are saying ‘no, it’s time for a change.'”

The two candidates have been running neck and neck since the beginning of the runoff campaign. Polls indicate any victory will be a narrow one in this bitterly fought election, described by many analysts as one of the most aggressive in Brazil’s recent history.

Whoever wins will have to deal with a deep political divide.

For more on how the economy is effecting voters’ decisions, CCTV America interviewed Paulo Sotero, director of the Brazil Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Paulo Sotero of Woodrow Wilson International Center discusses Brazil’s runoff election

For more on how the economy is effecting voters' decisions, CCTV America interviewed Paulo Sotero, director of the Brazil Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

CCTV America also interviewed Natalie Alhonte, associate director at the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

Natalie Alhonte of Atlantic Council discusses Brazil’s presidential election

CCTV America also interviewed Natalie Alhonte, associate director at the Atlantic Council's Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.