Colombia’s war with FARC has major consequences, study finds

Cuba

After five decades of war, Colombia’s government and rebels from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, continue to work on a peace deal in Cuba. A recent study shows that the toll this conflict has had on Colombia’s people may climb higher if talks fail.

According to a study by Juliana Castellanos Diaz at Politecnico GranColombiano, a university in Bogota, the Colombian government spent an average of $12.7 billion per year over the last decade on the conflict. Since 1985, 4.5 million people have been displaced, there have been 850,000 homicides, and 16,000 minors have been recruited in the war.

While the war has been costly, even peace has its price. According to the consumer knowledge firm Raddar [link in Spanish], added costs include demobilization of armed groups, reinsertion of former guerrilla members into civilian life, and the continued support of Colombia’s armed forces.

It may take another 20 years to shrink the war costs in Colombia, but these studies show that Colombians are beginning to experience a country and an economy that is not hindered with armed conflict.

CCTV America’s Michelle Begue reported this story in Bogota.

Colombia's war with FARC has major consequences, study finds

After five decades of war, Colombia's government and rebels from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, continue to work on a peace deal in Cuba. A recent study shows that the toll this conflict has had on Colombia's people may climb higher if talks fail. CCTV America's Michelle Begue reports.

Lisa Haugaard, the Executive Director of the Latin America Working Group, joined Biz Asia America to discuss how peace negotiations can impact Colombia’s economy.

Lisa Haugaard of Latin America Working Group discusses peace negiations and Colombia’s economy

Lisa Haugaard, the Executive Director of the Latin America Working Group, joined Biz Asia America to discuss how peace negotiations can impact Colombia's economy.