The Heat discusses Chinese, American perspectives on climate change

Climate Change

According to a stark United Nations’ report on global warming, the impact of climate change could be irreversible. The world’s two largest carbon emitters, China and the United States, recently signed a historic deal to reduce their carbon footprint.

Beijing pledged that by 2030, Chinese carbon pollution will peak and that 20 percent of the country’s energy will come from low-carbon sources.

“My government is making an unprecedented all-out effort to clean up pollution. My hope is that every day we will see a blue sky, green mountains and clear rivers, not just in Beijing, but all across China,” Chinese President Xi Jinping said.

For its part, the United States would cut its greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025. U.S. President Barack Obama is also asking the world to follow its lead.

“Whether you’re a developed country, a developing country or somewhere in between, you’ve got to overcome all divides, look squarely at the science and reach a strong, global climate agreement next year. And if China and the United States can agree on this, then the world can agree on this. We can get this done,” Obama said.

The China-U.S. deal is hailed by many as setting a positive tone for the start of December’s global climate conference in Peru, a gathering of representatives from nearly 200 governments. The goal of the summit is to get countries to make financial contributions and work toward a global deal to cut emissions.

The Heat discusses Chinese, American perspectives on climate change

The Heat discusses Chinese, American perspectives on climate change

According to a stark United Nations’ report on global warming, the impact of climate change could be irreversible. The world’s two largest carbon emitters, China and the United States, recently signed a historic deal to reduce their carbon footprint.
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The Heat interviewed Chris Field, director at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology, about the dangers that climate change poses to the world. Chris Field also contributed to the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report.

Chris Field discusses the danger climate change poses to the world

Chris Field discusses the danger climate change poses to the world

The Heat interviewed Chris Field, director at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology, about the dangers that climate change poses to the world. Chris Field also contributed to the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report.
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The Heat also spoke to a panel of experts to discuss the Chinese and U.S. perspectives on solutions to climate change.

  • Ryan Towell, director of science and solutions at the Climate Reality Project, a nonprofit founded by former U.S. Vice President and climate activist Al Gore.
  • Szeping Lo, the director at the World Wildlife Fund China.
Ryan Towell, Szeping Lo discuss China and US solutions to climate change

Ryan Towell, Szeping Lo discuss China and US solutions to climate change

The Heat also spoke to a panel of experts to discuss the Chinese and U.S. perspectives on solutions to climate change.
Download Video