Survivors mourn relatives killed in 1937 Nanjing Massacre

World Today

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Living survivors of the Nanjing massacre have been remembering family members who perished nearly eighty years ago. One survivor, now in his 80s, has been speaking to CCTV about his painful memories of an event in history that still resonates, many decades later.

CCTV America’s Elaine Reyes spoke with Wu Guoxiu from Nanjing Memorial Hall.

Live from Nanjing Memorial

Live footage from Nanjing Memorial where the ceremony is beginning in rememberance of the 300,000 victims of the 1937 Nanjing massacre.

CCTV America’s Elaine Reyes discussed the release of new evidence of the atrocities committed in 1937 Nanjing.

New evidence released while survivors remember Nanjing

New evidence is released while survivors mourn in rememberance of Nanjing.

 

CCTV America’s Jing Yiqiao reported this story from China.

Survivors mourn relatives killed in Nanjing Massacre

Living survivors of the Nanjing massacre have been remembering family members who perished nearly eighty years ago. One survivor, now in his 80s, has been speaking to CCTV about his painful memories of an event in history that still resonates, many decades later.

It’s early morning….

She Ziqing and his family came to the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall, carrying flowers for their lost loved ones.

Over 10,000 names are carved on the Nanjing Massacre Memorial wall…. each one a victim of the massacre.

For the few survivors who remain alive, they represent vivid memories that will never be forgotten.

“My memory is not as good as it used to be. But the painful experiences 77 years ago have left a mark on my heart. A warm and harmonious family was destroyed overnight,” She Ziqing said.

The 82-year-old was only five when the Japanese military invaded Nanjing in 1937.

Japanese troops started a bloody campaign on December 13th, 1937. His mother was among the 300 thousand civilians and Chinese soldiers who were murdered in cold blood by Japanese troops.

Fortunately, She Ziqing and his sister survived.

“When I came back, my mother had been killed. Not only my mother, but also all our neighbors were killed. They had all decided to stay in their houses and not flee the city,” She Ziqing said. “I have never been able to understand why the Japanese soldiers were so cruel, killing everybody they saw.”

Ten years ago, he decided to become a volunteer guide at the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall. He’s is still the oldest volunteer working there.

And when visitors come to see the footprints of survivors in the hall, Ziqing will show them his own footprints…. and tell them his own stories.