As NATO troops withdraw, Afghanistan sees rise in attacks

World Today

With just about two weeks to go until most of the foreign troops withdraw, security across Afghanistan reached a crisis point. CCTV’s Courtney Body reported from Kabul.

As NATO troops withdraw, Afghanistan sees rise in attacks

With just about two weeks to go until most of the foreign troops withdraw, security across Afghanistan reached a crisis point. CCTV's Courtney Body reported from Kabul.

The Afghan Taliban has killed a Supreme Court official, a group of mine clearers and two foreign soldiers,  as violence intensifies in the run-up to the withdrawal of most international troops in the next two weeks.

Many of Afghan people blamed neighboring countries, saying they are vying for regional power. But many others thought the Taliban were seeking retaliation for the security agreement recently signed with the US, keeping Americans in the country even longer.

“The signing of the BSA with the Americans, this is another issue, the insurgents want to show that they are against this treaty, and they are here to create a problem for the international community, the Afghan people and the Afghan government,” Mir Ahmad Joyenda, one Afghan Analyst, said.

The new president, Ashraf Ghani, addressed the nation promising to end the violence, but he did not say how. With the new government still struggling to put together a cabinet, including selecting the key defense and interior ministers, the people were demanding they do this, as they became increasingly afraid.

As the new government and the Afghan forces worked to secure the country, the increased violence was certainly a test.

As attacks increase in Kabul and across the country, both civilians and security forces are paying the price. And all any of them can do is hope that the new government can keep their promise, and until then that they aren’t in the wrong place