ISIL and al-Qaida offshoot magazines call for more lone wolf attacks

World Today

The Islamic State and an al-Qaida offshoot have both released new online magazines. These latest issues go well beyond simple propaganda and may provide a blueprint for future lone wolf terrorist attacks. CCTV America’s Jim Spellman reported this story from Washington D.C.

Terrorist magazines call for more lone wolf attacks

The Islamic State and an Al-Qaeda offshoot have both released new online magazines. These latest issues go well beyond simple propaganda and may provide a blueprint for future lone wolf terrorist attacks. CCTV America's Jim Spellman reported this story.

The magazines depict an image of the modern terrorist: A lone man bowing in prayer with a small pressure cooker bomb at his side, the same kind of bomb used by the Boston Marathon bombers.

“Lone Jihad against the West, especially when intensified, will create a state of terror, anxiety, public resentment and complaint against the governments and policies that brought about lone Jihad … So one operation is an episode in a series of Jihadi operations against America,” read an article in the al-Qaida offshoot’s Inspire magazine.

Recent lone wolf attacks like the Sydney siege, attacks in Canada, and a hatchet attack against New York City police officers are all praised on these pages.

Another excerpt from Inspire magazine said: “It’s not necessary to travel to the battlefield, it’s enough to kill the enemy back home.”

Inspire also includes detailed instructions for a so-called hidden bomb which are difficult for security forces to detect and made in a kitchen with household supplies. An article also gives hints for getting a device past security checkpoints.

In the Islamic State’s magazine, Dabiq, an article by British journalist and ISIL hostage John Cantlie details a new Islamic State currency, gold Dinars and silver Dirhams, and predicts the U.S economy will collapse due to the U.S Federal Reserve’s quantitative easing policies.

Dabiq also features what it said is an interview with a Jordanian pilot shot down Dec. 24 while on a bombing run against ISIL.

The pilot appears to lay out operational details of the U.S led coalition airstrikes, claiming that U.S and Jordanian pilots fly from bases in Jordan and socialize together and that the U.S has a female fighter pilot.

It is impossible to verify the authenticity of the interview, but the article ends on a chilling note:

“Dabiq: Do you know what the Islamic State will do with you?”

“Pilot: Yes…they will kill me.”