The Heat discusses solutions to India-Pakistan tensions, including Kashmir

The Heat

Islamabad and New Delhi have fought three wars since winning independence from British colonial rule in 1947, two of them directly over the disputed Kashmir region. While there has been a renewed push by the international community to find a long-term solution to the region, it’s unclear if the nuclear-armed neighbors will resume talks.

Kashmir lies at the heart of 67-years of hostility between the two countries, and thousands displaced by recent border clashes say it’s still not safe to return home. U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon has suggested dialogue is critical and during a recent visit to Pakistan, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry also called on the countries to find a diplomatic solution to Kashmir.

CCTV’s Shweta Bajaj and Danial Khan reported this story from New Delhi and Islamabad.

The Heat discusses solutions to India-Pakistan tensions, including Kasmir

The Heat discusses solutions to India-Pakistan tensions, including Kasmir

Islamabad and New Delhi have fought three wars since winning independence from British colonial rule in 1947, two of them directly over the disputed Kashmir region. While there has been a renewed push by the international community to find a long-term solution to the region, it's unclear if the nuclear-armed neighbors will resume talks.

The Heat interviewed a panel of experts on the issue:

* Aparna Pande, a research fellow and director of the Hudson Institute’s initiative on the future of India and South Asia.
* Masood Akhtar, a former fighter pilot for the Pakistan Air Force for 33 years who retired in 2005 as a three-star general.
* Michael Kugelman, senior program associate for South and Southeast Asia at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C.

Aparna Pande, Masood Akhtar, Michael Kugelman discuss India-Pakistan tensions

Aparna Pande, Masood Akhtar, Michael Kugelman discuss India-Pakistan tensions

Islamabad and New Delhi have fought three wars since winning independence from British colonial rule in 1947, two of them directly over the disputed Kashmir region. While there has been a renewed push by the international community to find a long-term solution to the region, it's unclear if the nuclear-armed neighbors will resume talks.

As the United States prepares to withdraw its last troops from Afghanistan, there’s growing concern about Islamic State and al-Qaida. Both groups are said to be recruiting in Kashmir and increased militant activity could further deteriorate the relationship between India and Pakistan. The Heat continues its conversation with the panel.

Aparna Pande, Masood Akhtar, Michael Kugelman discuss Kashmir

Aparna Pande, Masood Akhtar, Michael Kugelman discuss Kashmir

Islamabad and New Delhi have fought three wars since winning independence from British colonial rule in 1947, two of them directly over the disputed Kashmir region. While there has been a renewed push by the international community to find a long-term solution to the region, it's unclear if the nuclear-armed neighbors will resume talks.

  • Sumitha Gill

    It is the highest time that two historic rivals address the contentious
    issues especially Kashmir dispute. The US exit from Afghanistan can liable to
    open many fronts for both of these countries. The US President visit can play
    an instrumental role in persuading offensive India to come on table for talks
    with Pakistan. India has to leave its use of force policy against a nuclear
    weapon state.

  • Limpkisar

    India has to accept this very fact that, Kashmir is a disputed territory between India and Pakistan and it must be resolved according to the wishes of the people and UN resolution. Yet government of India has shown reluctance over the Pakistan’s peace initiatives.

  • Shirley Robertson

    the Kashmir dispute has to be resolved for long-term peace and stability in the region. Pakistan wants peace but with dignity and honour. The UN could play the role of a truly neutral mediator. This is a role that the US has sometimes sought to play, but with little success – particularly because there is mistrust in its relationship with both Islamabad and New Delhi. There really is no country that could be taken seriously as a credible mediator, given that few countries have deep, trusted relationships with both India and Pakistan.

  • Vikki

    Well those advocating to have India find a solution to Kashmir must know the ground reality too. I think the latest book of Christine Fair might help you to understand the issue better.

    Kashmir is just a symptom of the actual problem, the real problem is the ideology on which Pakistan has based its national narrative that is everything Anti- Hindu and thus Anti-India. Pakistan uses the loonies not just for Kashmir. It uses them to control Afghanistan, It sends them to checheneya, to uzbekistan. It uses them to control Balochistan, it uses them to fight against Iran too.