U.S. port dispute means bigger profits for local Hong Kong farmers

Global Business

The dispute may be over, but U.S. officials said it will take at least another two months before the flow of goods in and out of those Western U.S. ports is completely back to normal.

CCTV’s Cathy Yang filed this report from Hong Kong.

U.S. port dispute means bigger profits for local Hong Kong farmers

U.S. port dispute means bigger profits for local Hong Kong farmers

The dispute may be over, but U.S. officials said it will take at least another two months before the flow of goods in and out of those Western U.S. ports is completely back to normal. CCTV's Cathy Yang filed this report from Hong Kong.

The disruptions have already affected a couple of holiday celebrations in Hong Kong. In a remote part of the New Territories in Hong Kong, a garden full of mini trees of tangerines and round fruit sit waiting. The fruit is a staple item for display or gifting during Chinese New Year and symbolize wealth and luck to welcome Lunar New Year.

The port town of Kwai Chung wasn’t so lucky where imports of similar types of fruit from California haven’t arrived because of the near gridlock at America’s West Coast ports because of a prolonged labor dispute.

The long dispute in America’s West Coast ports is causing ripple effects all the way to Hong Kong, the fourth biggest container port in the world. Delays on fresh produce was severe over the Chinese Lunar New Year rush where seasonal items from the U.S. were in high demand, but in short supply.

It will take time for Hong Kong to recover from America’s port crisis, some say.
There’s a silver lining as America’s port crisis has helped give local farms around Hong Kong big profits this year.