Economic deterioration stimulates immigration to U.S.

Global Business

As relations between the United States and Venezuela have deteriorated over the years, the number of people leaving the South American country to migrate to the United States has grown exponentially. Since 2000, US government data show their numbers are up more than 135 percent and the current tensions are only expected to bring more. CCTV’s Andrea Arenas filed this report from Washington.

Economic deterioration stimulates immigration to U.S.

Economic deterioration stimulates immigration to U.S.

As relations between the United States and Venezuela have deteriorated over the years, the number of people leaving the South American country to migrate to the United States has grown exponentially. Since 2000, US government data show their numbers are up more than 135 percent and the current tensions are only expected to bring more.

Highlights:

  • Nearly 260,000 Venezuelans are legal residents in the U.S. according to the latest census, and that number is rapidly increasing.
  • The oil rich nation now struggles to provide even the most basic food and household supplies to its citizens.
  • Previous waves of Venezuelan immigrants date back to when Hugo Chavez took power in 1999. They were generally from the upper class – and came with wealth. Now, immigration officials say, the vast majority are middle class, with limited finances.
  • The White House declared Venezuela’s alleged human rights violations constitute a national security threat to the U.S.  and imposed sanctions against seven high-ranking officials.

Mark Weisbrot, research co-director, Center for Economic Policy talks about U.S. sanctions against Venezuela

To discuss about what it would take to turn the Venezuelan economy around and more, CCTV spoke to Mark Weisbrot, research co-director, Center for Economic Policy on U.S.

Mark Weisbrot, research co-director, Center for Economic Policy

Mark Weisbrot, research co-director, Center for Economic Policy

To discuss about what it would take to turn the Venezuelan economy around and more, CCTV spoke to Mark Weisbrot, research co-director, Center for Economic Policy on U.S.