US farmers in Midwest struggle with wettest summer in decades

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US farmers struggle in wettest summer in decades

Several states in the U.S. have reportedly had the wettest June on record since 1974.

A farmer we spoke to expects dramatic losses in crops this year. Some were even unable to plant their crops this season, while others are watching as the quality of their crop deteriorates in this unusually wet summer for the upper Midwest region of the U.S. CCTV America’s Roza Kazan filed this report from Tremont, Illinois.

Follow Roza Kazan on Twitter @rozakazancctv

US farmers struggle in wettest summer in decades

US farmers struggle in wettest summer in decades

Several states in the U.S. havehad the wettest June on record since 1974. A farmer that CCTV spoke to expects dramatic losses in crops this year. Some were even unable to plant their crops this season, while others are watching as the quality of their crop deteriorates in this unusually wet summer for the upper Midwest region of the U.S.

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Photos: US farmers struggle in wettest summer in decades

Several states in the U.S. have reportedly had the wettest June on record since 1974. A farmer that CCTV spoke to expects dramatic losses in crops this year. Some were even unable to plant their crops this season, while others are watching as the quality of their crop deteriorates in this unusually wet summer for the upper Midwest region of the U.S.

Farmer Kent Kleinschmidt said he received, “Almost 7 inches [of rain] in May”. Kleinschmidt said, “in June we had 19 inches and so far in July we had another, the first two weeks, we had another 7 1/2 inches so for the last two and a half months – I’ve had 33 and 1\2 inches.” According to Kleinschmidt, 33 and 1/2 inches is a whole year’s worth of moisture/precipitation (both snow and rain) in two and a half months.

David Ulhman said he hadn’t seen such a wet June since 1974. He expects to lose a quarter of both his soy and corn because so many seeds have washed away and the plants that did survive are such low quality. And due to the rain he expects he might face upwards of a 50 percent drop on the price he’ll be offered for his wheat.