COP21 to address ways to stop rising global temperatures

Global Business

The so-called Conference of Parties or COP21 kicks off next week in Paris. It is the yearly meeting of countries in the United Nations Framework on Climate change. The summit’s goal is to have a legally binding agreement to prevent global temperatures rising more than 2 degrees Celsius.

Scientists say anything above that will cause extreme weather events, but others fear that goal will be hard to reach since earth’s temperature has already risen nearly one percent since 1880.

Wang Tao discusses upcoming Conference of Parties meeting

CCTV America’s Phillip Yin interviewed Wang Tao, a resident scholar at the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy.

Wang Tao discusses upcoming Conference of Parties meeting

Wang Tao discusses upcoming Conference of Parties meeting

The so-called Conference of Parties or COP21 kicks off next week in Paris. It is the yearly meeting of countries in the United Nations Framework on Climate change. The summit's goal is to have a legally binding agreement to prevent global temperatures rising more than 2 degrees Celsius. Scientists say anything above that will cause extreme weather events, but others fear that goal will be hard to reach since earth's temperature has already risen nearly one percent since 1880. CCTV America's Phillip Yin interviewed Wang Tao, a resident scholar at the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy.
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Rachel Cleetus of Union of Concerned Scientists discusses COP21 agenda

CCTV America also interviewed Rachel Cleetus, the lead economist and climate policy manager with the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Rachel Cleetus of Union of Concerned Scientists discusses COP21 agenda

Rachel Cleetus of Union of Concerned Scientists discusses COP21 agenda

The so-called Conference of Parties or COP21 kicks off next week in Paris. It is the yearly meeting of countries in the United Nations Framework on Climate change. The summit's goal is to have a legally binding agreement to prevent global temperatures rising more than 2 degrees Celsius. Scientists say anything above that will cause extreme weather events, but others fear that goal will be hard to reach since earth's temperature has already risen nearly one percent since 1880. CCTV America also interviewed Rachel Cleetus, the lead economist and climate policy manager with the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists.
Download Video