The Heat: Militias in the U.S.

The Heat

An armed militia forcibly occupies a federal building in the U.S. state of Oregon raising questions about the role of militias in modern society.

The Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution reads: “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

The number of militias in the U.S. is on the rise along with a rise in anti-government sentiment. The 18th century founders of the United States considered militias a way for citizens to defend themselves from oppressive governments with large armies.

But are these armed groups still necessary? CCTV’s Jim Spellman reports.

Follow Jim Spellman on Twitter @JimSpellmanTV.

The Heat: Militias in the U.S. pt1

The Heat: Militias in the U.S. pt1

The Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution reads: “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” The number of militias in the U.S. is on the rise along with a rise in anti-government sentiment. The 18th century founders of the United States considered militias a way for citizens to defend themselves from oppressive governments with large armies. But are these armed groups still necessary? CCTV’s Jim Spellman reports. To explain the role of militias: John Lott, author of “More Guns, Less Crime” and former chief economist at the United States Sentencing Commission.

To explain the role of militias:

  • John Lott, author of “More Guns, Less Crime” and former chief economist at the United States Sentencing Commission.

To discuss why U.S. militia groups are on the rise:

The Heat: Militias in the U.S. pt2

The Heat: Militias in the U.S. pt2

The Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution reads: “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” The number of militias in the U.S. is on the rise along with a rise in anti-government sentiment. The 18th century founders of the United States considered militias a way for citizens to defend themselves from oppressive governments with large armies. But are these armed groups still necessary? To discuss why U.S. militia groups are on the rise: Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, a senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. Greg Vecchi is former chief of the FBI’s Behavioral Science Unit and a former FBI crisis and hostage negotiator.

  • Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, a senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.
  • Greg Vecchi is former chief of the FBI’s Behavioral Science Unit and a former FBI crisis and hostage negotiator.