Bomb blast in Ankara heightens political pressure

World Today

Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu arrives to speak to the press after a security meeting in the governor’s office in Ankara on February 20, 2016. Turkey is to introduce new national security measures, Davutoglu said in the wake of a suicide car bombing in Ankara that killed 28 people. (AFP / ADEM ALTAN)

Although the Kurdish militant group TAK (Kurdistan Freedom Hawks) claimed responsibility Friday for the Feb. 17 bombing in Ankara, Turkey’s prime minister continued to place blame with Syrian Kurdish YPG forces and vowed retaliation.

CCTV America’s Michal Bardavid joins us from Istanbul with more.

Follow Michal Bardavid on Twitter @michalbardavid

Bomb blast in Ankara heightens political pressure

Although the Kurdish militant group TAK (Kurdistan Freedom Hawks) claimed responsibility Friday for the Feb. 17 bombing in Ankara, Turkey's prime minister continued to place blame with Syrian Kurdish YPG forces and vowed retaliation. CCTV America's Michal Bardavid joins us from Istanbul with more.

Although Turkey’s attacks on Kurds at the Syrian border were discussed at a U.N. meeting, so far the security council has not come up with a resolution. Russia expressed regrets on the matter – Russia was expecting a swift response and the security council to urge Turkey to stop the shelling – however, they delayed making a decision until Monday.

Turkey was putting pressure on its’ allies to show solidarity – more than just words, as Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu put it. And with Russia putting just as much pressure, the conflict has put all sides at a difficult position politically.