How Trump’s anti-establishment candidacy is seen internationally

World Today

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in North Charleston, South Carolina, February 19, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON

To people outside the United States, the presidential candidate selection process can seem long and incomprehensible. That process took another step Saturday, with the six remaining Republicans competing in the southern state of South Carolina.

Businessman Donald Trump had a commanding lead in opinion polls. Two candidates, Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, fought hard for second and third — and perhaps an upset victory over Trump.

Meanwhile, Bernie Sanders failed in his bid to win the Democratic party caucuses in the state of Nevada. Hillary Clinton took that state.

Jonathan Kay is a columnist for Canada’s National Post and also the editor of Walrus magazine. He joined CCTV America to provide insight on how the anti-establishment candidacy of Donald Trump is seen internationally.

How the world sees Trump\'s candidacy for US president

Jonathan Kay is a columnist for Canada's National Post and also the editor of Walrus magazine. He joined CCTV America to provide insight on how the anti-establishment candidacy of Donald Trump is seen internationally.