Some European farmers wary of proposed transatlantic trade deal

Global Business

If passed the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership would be the world’s biggest free trade zone with a billion consumers. The partnership would eliminate tariffs on U.S. and European businesses that want to trade with each other. Negotiators believe they can wrap up talks by the end of the year, but many European farmers fear the deal will drive them out of business.

CCTV’s Kevin Ozebek reports from Thuin, Belgium.

Some European farmers wary of proposed transatlantic trade deal

If passed the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership would be the world's biggest free trade zone with a billion consumers. The partnership would eliminate tariffs on U.S. and European businesses that want to trade with each other. Negotiators believe they can wrap up talks by the end of the year, but many European farmers fear the deal will drive them out of business.CCTV's Kevin Ozebek reports from Thuin, Belgium.

Negotiations into the controversial partnership have stretched into a second week in Brussels.

Proponents of the proposed trade agreement, known as TTIP, say cutting tariffs between the U.S. and the EU would open huge new markets on both sides of the Atlantic.

But many European farmers are fighting the proposal. At a chicken farm in Thuin, one hour’s drive south of Brussels, chicken farmer Jean Marlier said he’s firmly against the proposed TTIP and said if the trade deal becomes a reality, the increased sale of less-expensive American chickens in Europe could collapse his business.

Despite the concerns of farmers, American and European Union officials negotiating the deal last week reported progress. They hope to have an agreement complete at the start of 2017.

Farm lobbyists have said that the TTIP could be beneficial to the EU agricultural sector and could give 300 million Americans duty-free access to Jean Marlier’s high quality chicken.