Trump outlines foreign policy goals should he become US president

World Today

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gives a foreign policy speech at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, Wednesday, April 27, 2016. Trump’s highly anticipated foreign policy speech Wednesday will test whether the Republican presidential front-runner, known for his raucous rallies and eyebrow-raising statements, can present a more presidential persona as he works to unite the GOP establishment behind him. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump outlined his approach to foreign policy on Wednesday, shifting attention to the general election campaign against democratic frontrunner and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

CCTV America’s Jessica Stone has the details.

Trump outlines foreign policy goals should he become US president

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump outlined his approach to foreign policy on Wednesday, shifting attention to the general election campaign against democratic frontrunner and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. CCTV America's Jessica Stone has the details.

Fresh off five primary wins, billionaire businessman Donald Trump has begun calling himself the Republican frontrunner. While he’s not promising to act “more presidential,” he delivered his foreign policy vision using a teleprompter and an eye toward the general election in November.

Trump drew a contrast with Republican President George W. Bush, who led the U.S. to war in Iraq in an effort to spread western democracy.

He blamed that policy — and President Barack Obama’s support for the Arab Spring uprisings — for creating a power vacuum that was ultimately filled by the terror group ISIL.

“Thousands of American lives, and many trillions of dollars, were lost as a result,” Trump said. “The vacuum was created that ISIS would fill. Iran, too, would rush in and fill the void, much to their unjust enrichment.”

Trump promised he would eliminate ISIL, but without detailing how, and said his foreign policy goal is to restore American military and economic power. He claims he will “fix” relations with both Russia and China — by taking a harder negotiating line with them — than the current White House.

“Fixing our relations with China is another important step towards a prosperous century. China respects strength, and by letting them take advantage of us economically, we have lost all of their respect,” Trump said. “We have a massive trade deficit with China, a deficit we must find a way, quickly, to balance.”

Trump used his speech to attack the foreign policy credentials of presumptive democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. As U.S. Secretary of State, she advocated for intervention in Libya.

“After Secretary Clinton’s failed intervention in Libya, Islamic terrorists in Benghazi took down our consulate and killed our ambassador and three brave Americans,” Trump said. “Then, instead of taking charge that night, Hillary Clinton decided to go home and sleep! Incredible.”

Clinton did not immediately react to Trump’s policy accusations, instead choosing to respond to his primary victory speech comments, when he said Clinton’s only appeal to voters is that she’s a woman.

“If fighting for women’s healthcare and paid family leave and equal pay is playing the woman card, then deal me in!” Clinton said Tuesday night.

Trump and the remaining Republican presidential candidates now look to lock in votes in Indiana. The state is essentially the last firewall for Trump’s opponents to slow him down, but they can’t seem to stop him. With her nomination all but wrapped up, Clinton has already begun reaching out to Bernie Sanders’ supporters.


Eleanor Clift on Trump’s foreign policy speech

For more on presidential nominee hopeful Donald Trump’s speech Wednesday, we’re joined by Eleanor Clift, a Washington-based journalist who has covered many presidential campaigns.

Eleanor Clift on Trump\'s foreign policy speech

For more on presidential nominee hopeful Donald Trump's speech Wednesday, we're joined by Eleanor Clift, a Washington-based journalist who has covered many presidential campaigns.