Reagan’s shooter to be freed from psychiatric hospital

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Reagan's shooter to be freed from psychiatric hospital

The man who tried to kill U.S. President Ronald Reagan 35 years ago will go free.

A judge ruled Wednesday morning that John Hinckley Junior can leave a Washington, D.C. mental hospital and live full-time with his mother.

CCTV America’s Jessica Stone reports.

Reagan's shooter to be freed from psychiatric hospital

Reagan's shooter to be freed from psychiatric hospital

The man who tried to kill U.S. President Ronald Reagan 35 years ago will go free. A judge ruled Wednesday morning that John Hinckley Junior can leave a Washington, D.C. mental hospital and live full-time with his mother. CCTV America's Jessica Stone reports.
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35 years after trying to kill Reagan, Hinckley will be released next month. A judge has ruled he’s no longer a danger to society.

The Reagan foundation reacted sharply, tweeting that Hinckley is “still a threat to others.”

Reagan’s son, Michael tweeted: “my father forgave John Hinckley Junior – maybe we should do the same.”

On March 30, 1981, Hinkley attempted to shoot President Reagan while he and his entourage were exiting the Washington Hilton Hotel. A bullet penetrated President Reagan’s lung, three other men were injured, and Reagan’s press secretary, James Brady, suffered lifelong brain trauma. Brady died in 2014, in part, from his injuries.

Authorities handcuffed Hinckley within minutes. Hinckley said he did it to impress American actress Jody Foster, who he had been stalking.

A year later, a judge found Hinckley not guilty by reason of insanity. Hinckley spent the next 34 years at St. Elizabeth’s hospital in Washington, D.C. But as early as 1999, he began making supervised visits outside the hospital.

By 2003, he was allowed unsupervised daytime visits with his parents, and five years ago the court began hearings that would lead to his permanent release.

A year ago, the court allowed him to spend 17 days a month at his parent’s home in Virginia.

Hinckley will continue to live under restrictions after his release. He still has to attend therapy sessions and come for regular checkups in Washington.

He’s also not allowed to contact survivors of the attack – or Jodie Foster.