Japan tackles avian flu outbreak among poultry, migrant birds

World Today

In Japan, the spread of avian flu among poultry and migrant birds is raising concern. The government has sprung into action to tackle the outbreak, which is caused by highly pathogenic viruses.

CCTV’s Terrence Terashima reports the story.

Japan tackles avian flu outbreak among poultry, migrant birds

In Japan, the spread of avian flu among poultry and migrant birds is raising concern. The government has sprung into action to tackle the outbreak, which is caused by highly pathogenic viruses. CCTV’s Terrence Terashima reports the story.

In recent weeks, a highly pathogenic avian flu was discovered in several prefectures in eastern Japan.

Authorities in Niigata prefecture said they have completed culling of over 550 thousand chickens, after an outbreak of bird flu is suspected in a coastal area.

While in northern Aomori prefecture, over 23,000 ducks were culled after ducks tested positive for the H5N6 bird flu strain.

Authorities said they have contained the area and designated 10-kilometer radius from the farms as a high-risk area and banned farms from transporting their birds and eggs out of the areas.

Under Japanese law, poultry has to be culled and buried within 72 hours from testing positive to highly pathogenic avian flu.

Authorities are trying to determine the areas of potential danger. But experts say it is hard as birds are migrating all over the country.

“The winter birds come into the country from various routes. They are migrating from Russia, from the Korean peninsula and some fly direct over the Sea of Japan. It is better to assume that the virus may have been brought in throughout Japan,” Seiji Hayama, manager of Conservation Division at Wild Bird Society of Japan said.

Local and central governments are inspecting parks and farms areas where migrant birds may fly in, issued a warning to refrain from touching birds.

Authorities are also trying to prevent harmful rumors from spreading. There is little danger of humans being infected by this avian flu. And it is safe to eat well-cooked chickens that are in the market.


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