The Heat: China’s Market Economy

The Heat

China's growing economyThe world’s second largest economy

When China joined the World Trade Organization in December of 2001, it agreed to let member countries treat it as a non-market economy for 15 years.

That allowed the U.S., EU and other WTO members to use prices from a third country as a benchmark to determine the true value of Chinese exports and impose heavy anti-dumping duties.

That clause by the World Trade Organization expired Sunday upgrading China to market economy status. 81 countries already acknowledge China as a market economy but the United States, the European Union and Japan are refusing to comply over concerns that cheap Chinese products could flood their markets.

To learn about the decision by the US, EU and Japan to refuse China market economy status, CCTV’s Yang Zhao reports from Beijing.

Tonight’s panel addresses the WTO decision and the China’s economy:

  • Keyu Jin, professor at the London School of Economics.
  • Shada Islam, director of Europe and Geopolitics at Friends of Europe.
  • Yukon Huang, senior fellow of the Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, D.C.
  • Daniel Dalton, member of the European Parliament.

The Heat: China's Market Economy PT 1

Fifteen years after China joined the World Trade Organization, Beijing’s hopes for recognition as a market economy are being challenged. To learn about the decision by the US, EU and Japan to refuse China market economy status, CCTV's Yang Zhao reports from Beijing. Tonight's panel addresses the WTO decision and the China's economy with Keyu Jin, professor at the London School of Economics; Shada Islam, director of Europe and Geopolitics at Friends of Europe; Yukon Huang, senior fellow of the Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, D.C. and Daniel Dalton, member of the European Parliament.

The Heat: China's Market Economy PT 2

Tonight's panel addresses the WTO decision and the China's economy with Keyu Jin, professor at the London School of Economics; Shada Islam, director of Europe and Geopolitics at Friends of Europe; Yukon Huang, senior fellow of the Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, D.C. and Daniel Dalton, member of the European Parliament.

 

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