Many deportees from U.S. stuck in Mexican border town

World Today

Many deportees from U.S. stuck in Mexican border town

Below America’s southern border, many deportees remain stuck in Mexico.

CGTN’s Franc Contreras traveled to Mexicali, where hundreds are stranded at a unique hotel.

Many deportees stuck in Mexican border towns

Below America's southern border, many deportees remain stuck in Mexico. CGTN's Franc Contreras traveled to Mexicali, where hundreds are stranded at a unique hotel.

Undocumented immigrants in a U.S. detention center await deportation. Most are men. The majority eventually will be sent to Mexico.

Mexico’s top federal immigration official in Baja California says for now, the Trump administration is on par with Obama era deportations.

“Around 60,000 were deported to Baja, California state each year in 2014, 2015 and 2016. And in the first months of 2017, the numbers remain consistent with Obama’s pace,” said Rodulfo Figueroa, a Mexican immigration official.

Many deportees have no money and nowhere to go. In Mexicali, hundreds find their way to the “Migrant Hotel.” The most recent arrivals are Haitians, who hoped to enter the U.S. as refugees. They see their chances of success decreasing with Donald Trump in the White House.

The hotel for deported migrants has become so full that many are sleeping here up on the roof top; the director says some stay one or two weeks and others -like the Haitians- take five to six months here.

39-year-old Pedro Trejo was deported seven times. In the U.S., he ran his own construction business and had several employees. Now he’s alone in Mexico and separated from his U.S.-born daughter.

As the Trump administration talks of increasing deportations, the shelter’s director prepares to receive them.

“Our shelter is now filled with Haitians and Central Americans. We will soon go beyond capacity. We have another building to house them, as we prepare for Trump’s mass deportations,” said Sergio Tamai, Director of the “Migrant Hotel.”

Many of the immigrants in this shelter cling to the dream of one day living and working in the United States, but the reality is their futures are far from certain. For now, they are learning to adapt to life in this border city.


Neena Dutta discusses U S immigration policies

For more on the public attitude around immigration policies in the U.S., CGTN’s Susan Roberts spoke to Neena Dutta. She’s the Principal Attorney of Dutta Law Firm.