Victims of alleged chemical attack in Syria getting medical treatment in Turkey

World Today

Victims of alleged chemical attack in Syria getting medical treatment in Turkey

Some of the Syrians wounded in a suspected chemical attack are receiving medical treatment in Turkey.

The town of Reyhanli is just across the border. And it’s where dozens of the critically injured have been transferred.

CGTN’S Natalie Carney reports.
Follow Natalie Carney on Twitter @NatalieCarney77

Victims of alleged chemical attack in Syria getting medical treatment in Turkey

Some of the Syrians wounded in a suspected chemical attack are receiving medical treatment in Turkey. The town of Reyhanli is just across the border. And it's where dozens of the critically injured have been transferred. CGTN'S Natalie Carney reports.

At a Turkey-Syria border crossing Abdul Majid Al Youssef is waiting for his brother who he hasn’t seen in four years.

But the reunion is bittersweet. Adnan Al Youssef is here to visit his injured relatives.

Their brother Jallal is also waiting, waiting to be rushed back to the hospital.

Inside, 12-year-old Rowan Al Youssef recites the names of the26 members of her family killed by the suspected chemical attack on the town of Khan Sheikhoun Tuesday.

Her teacher and many of her classmates also lost their lives.

55-year-old Rawda Al Youssef is the family matriarch.

“We were sleeping and the first thing we hear is the sound of an explosion. We ran out. We saw lots of smoke. Then we started (coughing sounds). We were evacuated to a hospital, which I don’t remember. Then I lost consciousness I woke up to find I was in Turkey and my son had died.” Rawda said.

Rawda’s other son was nowhere to be found or were his triplets, Jihad, Jude and Jad.

Rawda is the aunt of Abdul Hamid Al Youssef, the father cradling his dead twin babies in images seen around the world – images that helped spur U.S. President Donald Trump to fire 59 Tomahawk missiles on a Syrian air base two days later, the first direct assault on Assad’s government by the U.S.

Yet the family doesn’t seem to realize the impact that scene has had on the world, nor does it appear they care.

Jallal, still short of breath as a result of the attack, is now out of the hospital.

“Abdul Hamid is my cousin. But our family has 26 martyrs – they were not the only one. The Trump attack is like a TV series mocking Syrians. For 24 hours they talk about nothing but Syria, but today nothing. All the world has already made agreements about the Syrian people,” Jallal said.

61 victims of the attack were transferred to Turkey. Three have since died in hospital here. Turkey says autopsies show chemical agents were found in their systems, most likely the banned nerve gas Sarin.

Humanitarian groups say some 100 people in all were killed in the attack, including dozens of children. Up to 500 more people were injured.

Turkish authorities continue to investigate the attack, collecting soil from Khan Sheikhoun to be examined in the capital. Meanwhile, more casualties were reported Saturday from another air strike to hit the same town.