Developing countries implement tougher smoking restrictions

World Today

Every year, nearly 6 trillion cigarettes go up in smoke around the world. It’s an incredible number, translating into big business and profit for tobacco makers.

But, sales trends are shifting.

Research shows low- to middle-income countries smoking more, while high-income countries are smoking less. A trend linked to tougher smoking restrictions and anti-smoking campaigns.

CGTN’s Elaine Reyes reports.

Developing countries implement tougher smoking restrictions

Every year, nearly 6 trillion cigarettes go up in smoke around the world. It’s an incredible number, translating into big business and profit for tobacco makers. But, sales trends are shifting. Research shows low- to middle-income countries smoking more, while high-income countries are smoking less. A trend linked to tougher smoking restrictions and anti-smoking campaigns. CGTN’s Elaine Reyes reports.

Developing countries are implementing their own restrictions.

Take Chile. Nearly a decade ago, it banned smoking in public places and recently moved to tone down packaging and ban popular menthol-flavored cigarettes.

But it has caused some concern. Tobacco farms there are small and mostly family-run and farmers are concerned a tobacco crackdown would hurt them.

China wants to cut smoking rates, too. Each year, it smokes nearly half of the world’s cigarettes. That’s double the number of the next four countries combined.

It remains true despite capital Beijing’s efforts to set an example with a tough anti-smoking law, enacted a year and a half ago. It outlaws smoking in public places like offices, restaurants, hotels and hospitals. Those who violate the ban are fined. A similar nationwide ban is in the works.

For now, volunteers in Beijing, wearing blue vests, are out to educate the public.


Matthew L. Myers talks about the smoking and tobacco industry in China

For more on Chinese smoking and tobacco industry in China, CGTN’s Elaine Reyes spoke to Matthew L. Myers, president of Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.