Anti-drone market spawns while industry continues boom

Global Business

Head to a park or wide open spaces, and there’s a good chance you’ll spot a drone. With commercial deliveries on the verge of becoming reality too, the skies could get more a lot more crowded.

For some that’s cause for concern, spawning calls for the anti-drone market.

CGTN’s Mark Niu reports.

Anti-drone market spawns while industry continues boom

Anti-drone market spawns while industry continues boom

It's a sky-rocketing market that's also helping fuel another - the anti-drone industry - expected to be worth more than a billion dollars within five years.

Every month, around one million new drones enter the world’s airspace.

It’s a sky-rocketing market that’s also helping fuel another – the anti-drone industry – expected to be worth more than a billion dollars within five years.

“Drones evolved very quickly from last year from toys to absolutely versatile flying machines,” Joerg Lamprecht, CEO and Co-founder of Dedrone, said. “Today, they carry chainsaws, and they carry flamethrowers. Drones that carry weapons and can trigger guns and machines guns.”

Lamprecht claims every day criminals use drones to deliver drugs into prisons and companies use drones to steal secrets from competitors’ data centers.

Dedrone has protected both the Trump and Clinton presidential campaigns as well as prisons, stadiums and companies.

Through use of a radio frequency scanner, camera and audio sensors, Dedrone’s technology is able to detect and identify drones up to 1-point-6 kilometers away.

Machine learning algorithms also help the system do more.

New competitors have entered the market too, like ApolloShield which sends a signal to tell a drone to go home and AirSpace which uses a net to catch drones.


Brian Whiteside discusses future of the drone industry

CGTN’s Rachelle Akuffo spoke to to Drone Complier’s Brian Whiteside about the future of the drone industry and the challenges facing it.