New year brings in list of new laws around the world

Global Business

New year brings in list of new laws around the world

Thousands of new laws will take effect around the world now that the calendar has switched from 2016 to 2017.

Some of them will be applauded. Others will be dreaded. Controversial in some cases, trivial in others.

CGTN’s Karina Huber reports.

New year brings in list of new laws around the world

New year brings in list of new laws around the world

Thousands of new laws will take effect around the world now that the calendar has switched from 2016 to 2017. Some of them will be applauded. Others will be dreaded. Controversial in some cases, trivial in others. CGTN’s Karina Huber reports.
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Revelers ring in the New Year in Times Square, an annual ritual that is usually followed by a list of New Year’s resolutions.

But the New Year also brings in a list of changes that are not a matter of choice. Around the world, countless new laws will be implemented in 2017.

In California alone, nearly 900 were passed in 2016 many of which go into effect this year.

Gun owners there stocked up on semi-automatic rifles with sales more than doubling in the state last year-ahead of a new state regulation that expands bans on assault weapons.

California is also increasing its minimum wage as are 17 other states impacting millions of U.S. workers.

Workers in European countries like France and Germany will get a pay raise, too. And European Union citizens traveling within the EU will see a drop in their cell phone bills in 2017. Roaming charges for texts, calls and data within member states will be banned as of June.

Other new laws are sure to please environmentalists. Cars in Paris will now bear “pollution stickers”-color-coded for the ‘cleanest’ and ‘dirtiest’ cars. The dirtiest will have to stay home on days when air pollution spikes. France is also expanding its ban on plastic bags from supermarkets only to include fruit and vegetable markets.

And China’s commitment to ban the ivory trade by the end of 2017 is seen as a big win for conservationists. The tobacco industry is also set for major changes.

California legalized the use of recreational marijuana – as did Massachusetts, Nevada and Maine – bringing the total tally of U.S. states where smoking a joint for fun is legal to eight.

Also in China, the world’s largest consumer of tobacco products, it will become harder to smoke cigarettes. At least 20 Chinese cities like Beijing and Shanghai have banned smoking in public places. A national ban is expected by the end of this year.

And in New York City, 2017 will provide a boost to the bottom line of beer makers. Local breweries will get about a penny per bottle sold in tax breaks. The hope is not to create more drinkers, but more jobs for a growing industry.


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