Women computer science majors breakdown tech stereotypes

Global Business

Women computer science majors breakdown tech stereotypes

Traditionally and still to today, the majority of college computer science majors are male.

One of the biggest reasons often cited is the stereotype that females just don’t like coding or they aren’t good at it.

But one college in California is shattering those stereotypes.

CGTN’s May Lee reports.

Women computer science majors breakdown tech stereotypes

Women computer science majors breakdown tech stereotypes

Traditionally and still to today, the majority of college computer science majors are male. One of the biggest reasons often cited is the stereotype that females just don't like coding or they aren't good at it. But one college in California is shattering those stereotypes. CGTN’s May Lee reports.
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Jane Wu never thought she would like computer science but she now loves it! If she were at any other college or university, Jane would be part of a small minority of females.

But not at Harvey Mudd College, one the country’s best math, science and engineering schools, where more than 50 percent of computer science majors are women versus just 16 percent nationwide.

It wasn’t always like that. Ten years ago, only 10 percent of computer science graduates were female. The college revamped its mandatory intro computer science class by making it less intimidating, more creative and leveled the playing field.

And to temper the so called “macho-effect”, when a more experienced student, usually male, dominates the class, professors tell them privately to give others a chance and have more advanced talks with teachers one-on-one.

One of the most enticing reasons to go into computer science is jobs. Right now, there’s a 50 percent gap between available tech jobs and qualified candidates. That’s a big gap that can be filled by female graduates, which will help fix the imbalance at some of the world’s biggest tech companies.

Only 17 percent of tech jobs at Google are held by women. Facebook with 15 percent and Twitter, women have just 10 percent of tech roles. But don’t tell that to students like Jane Wu, whose focus is on robotics. And not only is Chairman Nao cute, but he has one mean Tai Chi routine.