Aftermath of Anti-China Protest in Vietnam

Global Business

It’s been more than a week now since anti-China protesters in Vietnam attacked foreign-owned factories. CCTV’s Barnaby Lo traveled to one of the hardest hit industrial parks just north of  Ho Chi Minh, and he brings us this report.

Aftermath of Anti-China Protest in Vietnam

Aftermath of Anti-China Protest in Vietnam

It's been more than a week now since anti-China protesters in Vietnam attacked foreign-owned factories. CCTV's Barnaby Lo traveled to one of the hardest hit industrial parks just north of Ho Chi Minh, and he brings us this report.

This notice outside a bicycle spare parts plant says operations have resumed but a quick peek inside showed no movement only signs of an attack.

Violence broke out in Vietnam last week amid protests against China’s deployment

If an oil rig near islands in the South China Sea administered by China, but also claimed by Vietnam. Four Chinese nationals were killed.

Chinese employees of this ink manufacturing company say they ran up and hid when they heard that the rioters were headed their way. And when it was over, this was all that was left of their offices.

Lucy Tan, Manager of Trust CO., told CCTV reporter: “It’s scary to even think about it. We lost a lot of our office equipment, our personal belongings and valuables and they even stole products from our warehouse.”

As people can see, there are no more windows in the facility.  People can actually see right through the office and here at the main entrance there were actually two huge glass doors but they’re also gone now.

In another Chinese facility, operations are back in full swing. Many others are following suit, after the Vietnamese government offered compensation and assured them of their safety.

Nguyen Hong Linh, Director of Vietnam Department of External says: “We are investigating the matter. We will make sure those responsible will be met with the full force of the law. And aside from cash compensation, we are trying to locate looted items so that we can give them back to the owners.”

Around 400 factories – not necessarily Chinese-owned – were damaged during the rampage. Products from these industrial zones account for 30 percent of Vietnam’s exports enough to also make an impact on the global supply chain if left unresolved.

But the Vietnamese government appears to be determined to win back investor confidence. More than four hundred people have been arrested and so far, it’s giving foreign investors little to no reason to pack and leave.