Interview with Brazilian activist Marina Silva

Americas Now

Marina Silva

Elaine Reyes sits down with Marina Silva whose name for many Brazilians, is synonymous with activists’ politics.

At age 36, Marina Silva would become the youngest person ever elected to the Brazilian Senate. Later she’d become President Lula’s Minister of Environment. And in the last presidential contest, she was a threat to Dilma Rousseff, winning 19% of the votes for the Green Party in the first round elections. This year, she’s poised to run again. Having shifted parties, she’ll be the vice presidential candidate on Brazil’s socialist ticket.

Brazil’s presidential elections will take place in October. And current president Dilma Rousseff is still ahead in the polls, with a likely 38% vote. But in Brazil, more than half of total votes are necessary to win the office. This means if elections were today, there would be a runoff.

Marina Silva, alongside Presidential candidate Eduardo Campos will be one of President Rousseff’s challengers and even though their party has only 10% of the votes at this time, experts are watching carefully as they know she’s disrupted elections before.

Interview with Brazilian activist Marina Silva

Interview with Brazilian activist Marina Silva

Elaine Reyes sits down with Marina Silva whose name for many Brazilians, is synonymous with activists’ politics.