India rape analysis: crimes against women increasing

World Today

India rape analysis: crimes against women increasing

A tougher law on rape with increased penalties was enacted in India after a 2012 Delhi gang rape sparked widespread protests. A year and a half later, rapes do not seem to be declining. India correspondent Shweta Bajaj reports.

It’s a struggle for these young girls as they live their lives, feeling threatened in their own communities. It’s almost an epidemic. Graphic pictures of two girls hanged from tree after being raped in India went viral all over the world. Within a span of a week, 2 other similar rape cases surfaced in the same state: Uttar Pradesh. While these cases made news headlines, many still go unreported.

In 2012, a Delhi gang rape forced the Indian government to introduce a new, tougher rape law. In reality, however, nothing has changed for women. The new Indian rape law promised quicker convictions, shorter trials and more ease for victims who go to report cases of sexual violence and crime to the authorities. Even so, the parents of the Delhi gang rape’s victim still await justice. Many experts say the lower rate of convictions is one of the many reasons why there has been a rise in cases of rapes.

Other than low conviction rates, the common reasons cited for rapes in the country includes India’s patriarchal and hierarchical society, an insensitive polity and lack of education. The solution, experts say, is an efficient administration responsible to the issues at hand. After the Delhi Gang Rape the newly formed fast track courts in India took up nearly 300 trials (299). Out of these, only 95 led to convictions. According to India’s National crime bureau report for 2012, an overwhelming 85 percent of rape cases are still awaiting trial in court.

India’s new government has promised a safer India for its women. But everyone here knows, that will not be an easy task.

India rape analysis: crimes against women increasing

India rape analysis: crimes against women increasing

A tougher law on rape with increased penalties was enacted in India after a 2012 Delhi gang rape sparked widespread protests. A year and a half later, rapes do not seem to be declining. India correspondent Shweta Bajaj reports.

A United Nations child rights watchdog group released a report, showing that Indian law enforcement and justice authorities have not done enough to fight sexual assaults in the country. CCTV spoke to Mallika Dutt, CEO and founder of Breakthrough, a group dedicated to ending violence against women, and asked her for her thoughts on the report.

Mallika Dutt on Indian law enforcement and justice

Mallika Dutt on Indian law enforcement and justice

A United Nations child rights watchdog group released a report, showing that Indian law enforcement and justice authorities have not done enough to fight sexual assaults in the country. CCTV spoke to Mallika Dutt, CEO and founder of Breakthrough, a group dedicated to ending violence against women, and asked her for her thoughts on the report.