White House says most kids at border won’t stay in U.S.

World Today

Congress returns to Washington with four weeks to deal with the escalating immigration crisis, and so far they have not reached an agreement on what will work. Tracie Potts reports.

It is estimated that about 90,000 children will be coming to the United States from Central America by themselves by the end of 2014. The U.S. government tried to send them to small border towns such as Murietta, Calif., but so far residents of such towns have not been welcoming of the immigrant children.

The Obama administration is asking for $2 billion in emergency funds to handle the problem, and will make the decision to act on its own if Congress does not fulfill the request.

The political disagreement over this crisis continues, as some lawmakers want to seal off the border, while Democrats and Republicans are still at a standoff within their own parties.

So far, lawmakers in Washington have offered two solutions: increase penalties for immigrant smugglers, or hire an additional 6,000 border patrol agents, plus more fencing and cameras at the border.

White House says most kids at border won't stay in U.S.

White House says most kids at border won't stay in U.S.

Congress returns to Washington with four weeks to deal with the escalating immigration crisis, and so far they have not reached an agreement on what will work. Tracie Potts reports.
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