Malaysia Airlines forced to review troubled business operations

Global Business

From the disappearance of one aircraft and the shooting down of a second, Malaysia Airlines has been forced to review its troubled business operations.

The review is expected to conclude in a radical re-branding of the beleaguered airline, including a name-change. CCTV America’s Richard Bestic reports.

Malaysia Airlines forced to review troubled business operations

From the disappearance of one aircraft and the shooting down of a second, Malaysia Airlines has been forced to review its troubled business operations.The review is expected to conclude in a radical re-branding of the beleaguered airline, including a name-change. CCTV America's Richard Bestic reports.

In just four months, the name of Malaysia Airlines has been blighted by tragedy unprecedented in aviation history.

First MH370 disappeared off the map en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 passengers aboard. It has become one of the great aviation mysteries of the modern age.

A disaster followed by the further tragedy of flight MH17 – shot down as it flew over land held by rebel fighters in the East of the Ukraine. The human carnage has seen the airline’s ticket sales and shares plummet.

Market professionals insist Malaysian Airlines can only be saved by radical re-branding.

Paul Lindsell, Managing Director at MindMetre Market Research said, “The reality out there in the market place is not only should they, but they absolutely must. Indeed, if they don’t they’ll be dead as a business.”

Changes are already underway. The call signs for MH370 and MH17 both abandoned by the airline. But as the Malaysian government led review gets underway, there remain questions about the safety of the flight route taken by the ill-fated flight MH17 directly over a conflict zone.

Despite the human tragedy, the company will survive, said Hugh Dunleavy, Commercial Director at Malaysian Airlines.

‘We’ll come out of this stronger and every time you have these kind of tragedies, we will adjust our processes and procedures to make sure we learn everything we can from them, help us to be stronger and avoid them in the future.’

Financially, Malaysia Airlines was in a difficult place even before the disasters of flight MH17 and MH370. Restructuring and saving the company from a terminal decline will take years and there is no guarantees of success.