Kurds increasingly frustrated at Turkey’s inaction in Kobane

World Today

American-led forces continued their air bombardment against the Islamic State as Kurdish forces also continued to fight ISIL in the northern Syrian town of Kobane on Wednesday. Turkey continues to consider their commitment to fighting the extremists. CCTV America’s Natalie Carney reports.

Turkish Kurds anxiously watched the events in Kobane unfold from a hilltop just meters away, chanting supportive slogans to the Kurdish fighters in battle.

Jailed Kurdish leader Abdullah Ocalan gave Turkey until Oct. 15 to advance peace talks in the 30-year civil war between the banned Kurdistan Workers’ Party — PKK –and Turkey. He also threatened an end to the talks should Kobane fall to ISIL control.

While the peace process is not directly linked to the events in Kobane, Turkey’s continued inaction over the events may give Kurds reason to believe Turkey is not taking the process seriously enough.

A breached ceasefire agreement and deadly countrywide protests against Turkey’s unwillingness to help the predominantly Kurdish town of Kobane have reignited tensions between the two communities.

While Turkey continues to negotiate its involvement, many Turks worry that war could again return to their streets.

Kurds increasingly frustrated at Turkey\'s inaction in Kobane

American-led forces continued their air bombardment against Islamic State. Kurdish forces also continued to fight ISIL in the northern Syrian town of Kobane on Wednesday, as Turkey continues to consider their commitment to fighting the extremists. CCTV America’s Natalie Carney reports.

For more on the fight against ISIL, CCTV America was joined by Phyllis Bennis, director of the New Internationalism project at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington. She has been a writer, analyst, and activist on Middle East and U.N. issues for many years.

Phyllis Bennis from the Institute for Policy Studies discusses the battle against ISIL

For more on the fight against ISIL, CCTV America was joined by Phyllis Bennis, the director of the New Internationalism project at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington. She has been a writer, analyst, and activist on Middle East and UN issues for many years.