Families identify victims of al-Shabab’s bus attack in Kenya

World Today

Kenya’s security forces said they’ve killed more than 100 militants linked to Saturday’s deadly bus attack. Somali terror group al-Shabab claimed responsibility for the execution-style killings of more than two dozen people. As CCTV America’s Maria Galang reports, authorities have vowed to step up security, in hopes of preventing a repeat.

“Al-Shabab are playing a bad game,” said Noah Mwavinda, Mandera County Police Commissioner in Kenya.

Residents of Umarijilau, a small town on the outskirts of Mandera, heard the shots Saturday morning. They said al-Shabab has attacked their town before, and they expect more attacks.

“Day and night, we are afraid that al-Shabab will come and attack,” said a military officer of Umarijilau.

For Mandera’s minority Christian population, this Sunday’s church service was like no other before it. Many feared they are now targets.

“I’ve lived here for four years, and this is the first time that Christians have been targeted,” said Festus Murimi Kanyi, the church leader of Redeemed Gospel Church of Mandera.

By some accounts, there’d been 10 attacks in this area blamed on al-Shabab in recent weeks.

Local leaders had been pleading for more security. They’ve now been promised that.

Families identify victims of Al-Shabaab's bus attack in Kenya

Kenya's security forces said they've killed more than 100 militants linked to Saturday's deadly bus attack. Somali terror group Al-Shabaab claimed responsibility for the execution-style killings of more than two dozen people. As CCTV America's Maria Galang reports, authorities have vowed to step up security, in hopes of preventing a repeat.