Uber car service faces hurdles in Manila

Global Business

The car-sharing service Uber is growing in popularity in Manila but it has also been challenged with questions about the legitimacy of its operations. CCTV America’s Barnaby Lo reported this story from Manila, the Philippines.

The average travel speed along Manila’s main highway is 15 kilometers, or 9.3 miles, an hour, which frustrates many in the Philippine capital.

“In the bus, I am already standing up because it’s the rush hour. So there are a lot of people already and there’s like chaos in the streets. So I’m already exhausted even before I start working,” said Jaymie Pagsishan, Manila resident.

For a certain segment of Metro Manila commuters, Uber has become one of the better transport alternatives. But because it is a paid service, is it then classified as public transport? And if it is, are its contractors operating legally in the Philippines?

Uber-contracted vehicles were in fact targets of a sting operation last month. So at the moment they are not yet legal, according to local land transportation authorities.

“We are not stopping the operation of Uber in its entirety. What we are stopping is the operation of Uber making use of private vehicles,” said Mary Ann Aslada from the city’s land transportation franchising and regulatory bureau.

Uber car service faces hurdles in Manila

The car-sharing service Uber is growing in popularity in Manila but it has also been challenged with questions about the legitimacy of its operations. CCTV America's Barnaby Lo reported this story from Manila, the Philippines.