Why a new generation is falling in love with Bolero

Americas Now

Bolero band

It’s a style of music that emerged in Cuba over a century ago. It’s slow, melodic and like so many genres of music, it’s about love and (of course) heartbreak. It’s called Bolero, and it can be heard in cafes and cabarets all over Cuba, alongside couples dancing cheek to cheek.

For years, Bolero took a backseat to the more popular Salsa and Latin Rock, but in the 1990s, a resurgence of Bolero music took place. New recordings of the old classics introduced this romantic music to a whole new generation. Recently, a celebration of Bolero music was held across the ocean from where it originated. A group of legendary Cuban musicians traveled to Barcelona to perform at the annual Bolero Festival.

Curiously, one of the festival’s main acts was not an islander, but rather a native. CCTV Correspondent Gerry Hadden meet Moncho, the Catalonian gypsy, king of Bolero. With his unique background, Moncho brings his own style of bolero to Spain, one that is not traditional but adored by his many fans on both sides of the Atlantic.

“We gypsies carry the music in our blood. You just grab a guitar, people start clapping, and we’re off singing a rumba catalana or I’ll belt out a bolero or two,” Moncho said.

Follow Gerry Hadden on Twitter @gerryhadden

Bolero, the music of love, celebrated

Bolero, the music of love, celebrated

It’s a style of music that emerged in Cuba over a century ago. It’s slow, melodic and like so many genres of music, it’s about “love.” It’s called Bolero.

On Twitter: @gerryhadden , @Moncho_bolero, @cubaconl, @LaKara_Boleros, @festibolerorio