Charlie Hebdo sells 5 million copies one week after massacre

World Today

Charlie Hebdo was back on the newsstands Wednesday morning, publishing its first issue since 12 people were murdered at its Paris office a week ago. The magazine sold an unprecedented five million printed copies with a cover as controversial and defiant as ever. CCTV’s Kate Parkinson reported this story from Paris.

Millions of the so-called “survivors’ edition” were printed and sold out within hours across the city, dwarfing the normal print run of 60,000.

For Arash Derambarsh, a friend of the murdered cartoonists, the huge demand sends a strong message.

“This newspaper is alive… and maybe we don’t want to read it, but we want to fight for it to be published. Today, this Wednesday, this newspaper at first was published at three million (copies) and we know that it was full, all the people bought this newspaper. And so, it will be published, finally at five million,” he said.

The cover, which features a cartoon of a tearful Prophet Mohammad carrying a sign reading “Je suis Charlie” (I am Charlie) has divided opinions.

Defenders praised the image for remaining true to the newspaper’s satirical soul.

Critics expressed concern that it could create more tension, and lead to a rise in Islamophobia.

“When you draw the Prophet on the first cover you make a link between Islam, between the Muslim community, and what happened to Charlie Hebdo, and to the 17 people that died. So I think it was not necessary to do that,” one critic who did not give a name said [insert gender, his or her name]. “They should have made something about terrorism, about the solutions we have to make to live all together without any discrimination and without any war between our communities. So I think they made a bad choice.”

Muslim leaders around the world have also criticized Charlie Hebdo’s decision to publish more cartoons depicting Mohammad which they believe is a show of disrespect that could provoke a new backlash. Muslims consider any rendering — satirical or not — of Muhammad to be offensive, and sometimes even blasphemous.


Global frenzy for Charlie Hebdo’s first publication following Paris massacre

Citizens in Paris arrived before the news vendor to get a copy of the most famous magazine in the world at the moment. One kiosk in Rome had all its 25 copies gone by dawn. Some think it’s worth more than the $3.50 cover price, with one U.K. edition going for $144,000 on eBay. CCTV America’s Owen Fairclough reported the story from Washington, D.C.

Global frenzy for Charlie Hebdo\'s first publication following Paris massacre

Global frenzy for Charlie Hebdo\'s first publication following Paris massacre

Citizens in Paris arrived before the news vendor to get a copy of the most famous magazine in the world at the moment. One kiosk in Rome had all its 25 copies gone by dawn. Some think it’s worth more than the $3.50 cover price, with one U.K. edition going for $144,000 on eBay. CCTV America’s Owen Fairclough reported the story from Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C.’s Newseum, dedicated to the media, placed Charlie Hebdo’s front page on display. Some media outlets selling international newspapers and magazines told CCTV America they’re unlikely to get physical copies until next week.

Charlie Hebdo’s long-term future depends on financial help and it is appealing for donations around the world. Both the French government and media have rallied to provide more than $1 million of funding and donations to keep the magazine in circulation.


Psychologist Ann Rosen Spector discusses rebuilding of Charlie Hebdo

CCTV America interviewed Ann Rosen Spector, a clinical psychologist, to discuss how the French magazine can move forward after such tragic events.

Psychologist Ann Rosen Spector discusses rebuilding of Charlie Hebdo

Psychologist Ann Rosen Spector discusses rebuilding of Charlie Hebdo

CCTV America interviewed Ann Rosen Spector, a clinical psychologist, to discuss how the French magazine can move forward after such tragic events.