Concerns over backlash against immigrants grow in France following attacks

World Today

Details continue to surface about the gunmen who shot 17 people dead in Paris last week, as concerns grow that their North African backgrounds and links to terrorist groups will spark renewed xenophobia in France. CCTV’s Sandra Gathmann reported the story from Paris.

Concerns over backlash against immigrants grow in France following attacks

Details continue to surface about the gunmen who shot 17 people dead in Paris last week, as concerns grow that their North African backgrounds and links to terrorist groups will spark renewed xenophobia in France. CCTV's Sandra Gathmann reported the story from Paris.

Charif and Said Kouachi, who stormed the Charlie Hebdo magazine, were of Algerian descent. Amedy Coulibaly, who attacked the kosher supermarket, was of Senegalese origin. All three lived in Paris’ multicultural neighborhoods.

Many of France’s Muslim and immigrant populations said they are wary of a backlash and potential crackdowns due to the rising popularity of right wing parties.

“This is going to affect the immigrants. Seriously. Because as I’ve said the far right thinks the foreigners are the problem they are facing now,” one Paris resident said who did not give a name.

Paris is very culturally diverse, with almost 40 percent of residents coming from immigrant families.

“African migration is much more family oriented migration, they are much more among themselves, and there’s a bigger control of their youth. It’s the same with the Turkish migration,” Riva Kastoryano, director of research for Science-P0 said.

“But North Africans are much more — the more you are integrated into the society the more you are individualistic, the more you are on your own — and this is one of the effects, and the more you are on your own, the more you have websites bringing you into something.”